How socially isolating is hearing loss?

Hello!

Sometimes people will refuse to wear any hearing aids and will deny that they need them. It is true. They don’t need them, but it can have a pretty dramatic impact on their quality of life. Do you know what is one of the things that they can help with the most? Their social life.

“blindness cuts us off from things, but deafness cuts us off from people.” -Helen Keller

Helen Keller believed that deafness was a “much worse misfortune”. The reason being that most languages are spoken. I remember hearing about a family who had a deaf daughter. A few of the immediate family members could sign, but every so often they would invite extended family to dinner, none of who would know how to sign. At first one of the siblings would try to include the deaf girl, but with a bunch of people, the conversation bouncing around from person to person, and with multiple conversations going on, it was hard for the sibling to sign everything, so they would eventually give up, leaving the deaf girl out of the conversation completely. So the girl eventually just started going to her room after she was finished with her dinner, because it was pretty much impossible for her to follow what was going on. So she missed out on a lot of chances to socialize and communicate with her family, because of this.

Now I am not deaf, but I go to restaurants every so often with a big group of my friends and hearing aids are terrible for those type of situations. People usually go to restaurants specifically to socialize, yet I am there struggling to catch any of the conversations, which does feel very isolating. I feel myself start to shut down after awhile, because the energy I have to use to follow along is incredibly draining. If I didn’t have any hearing aids, I would shut down almost immediately. Every so often I end up in situations where I am without my hearing aids and people are talking to each other. Every time I shut down from the beginning, because it makes me feel like a burden having to get people repeat things a bunch of times and then them eventually saying “never mind” or “It isn’t anything important”. The thing is it is incredibly important to me, because I value what others have to say. I want others to know that I want to listen to them, but at the same time I know it can be frustrating to others. If it is that frustrating to repeat yourself, can you imagine how frustrating it is to be the person who is embarrassing themselves and can’t understand what someone is saying after multiple attempts?

I understand that being blind has its own problems that would seem impossible fr me to overcome, but I don’t think that people often realize just how it can feel to be excluded from a lot of conversations. Being deaf can be similar to living in a foreign country that speaks a language that you can’t speak. Ever. On the plus side, at least deaf people can learn to read English, which definitely helps. I’m not going to pretend that I understand how isolating being completely deaf can be, but being hard of hearing, I do get a little taste of what it is like. This is one reason why deaf communities are important. So that deaf people can experience fluid communication and language with people similar to them.

Thanks for reading!

Colorful Molds and Pride

Hello!

So this will be about having colorful hearing aid molds. First hearing aid molds, are the soft squishy part of a BTE hearing aid that sits inside of the ear canal. I’ve only ever had colorful molds. Green. Blue. White. Purple. Pink. One color that I pretty much always have somewhere is purple, because purple is my favorite color and I would try other colors more if I weren’t limit to one pair at a time and if I got to change my molds more often than every few years. It isn’t quite like braces where you can change the elastics in a month when you visit the orthodontist again.

Something that I’ve noticed over the years is that generally elderly people who lose their hearing due to age tend to have skin/nude colored hearing aids. People who have had them since they were really young tend to go for the crazy colors. Even though I am now 21 years old, I still am not at all interested in the plain looking hearing aids, and a lot of my friends who are now young adults and grew up with hearing aids. I never understood why until I got to talk more with elderly people with hearing loss. They try everything they can to hide their loss. They go for the most hidden hearing aids that they can get. It always felt almost vain to me.

One reason that I wear brightly colored hearing aids is so that people notice them. This is one of the ways that I show my pride in being this way. My pride in overcoming some of the struggles I’ve encountered being HoH. It is a way to show people that I might need a little bit of assistance at times. It is my way of making sure people can see that part of myself, because it is part of my identity. There are things that I never would’ve gotten the opportunity to do had it not been for my hearing loss. So to be ashamed of my hearing loss and go out of my way to hide them would really be a shame. I’ve worked hard to have a fairly normal sounding voice. I continue to work hard to improve my singing voice, despite having a slight disadvantage over others. I’ve danced for most of my life, despite struggling a bit to hear the music at times. I want people to know that I have a hearing loss. Not to play the “handicapped” card, but to show that I have done a lot despite it.

In the future, I will cover the some of the reasons that elderly people go out of their way to hide their hearing loss.

Hard of Hearing?

Hello!

My name is Mckena, I am 21 years old, and I am hard of hearing. What that means is that I have a hearing loss. A few common ways to shorten the term hard of hearing is HoH or HH. You may also see it written as hard-of-hearing. Personally it doesn’t really offend me, but calling someone hearing impaired may be seen as offensive to some, so I recommend that you avoid saying that.

I do wear hearing aids. I have worn two of them since I turned 3 years old, even though the hearing loss has been present since birth. I’ve always worn very bright and colorful hearing aids, because I’ve always wanted to have hearing aids that are prettier, instead of the plain skin color hearing aids that are almost completely hidden inside the ears.

I am hoping to cover many topics related to my experiences as a young adult with hearing loss. I hope that what I share is useful for people with many different levels of hearing loss and different ages. I am fully aware that this is a condition that is primarily associated with elderly people. I have gotten to hear the perspectives of the many different types of people with hearing loss.

Thank you for reading all of this! Let me know if there are any particular topics you want me to cover.