Terminology

This is my big list of terms that I’ll be updating as I think of more words that I think is useful to know.

Acquired deafness- deafness that isn’t present at birth and occurs later on in life.

American Sign Language- A language most commonly used in North America that uses hand movements and facial gestures. It is a complete language that is mostly used by deaf people. It has its own unique grammar and syntax. It is also known as ASL.

ASL- acronym for American Sign Language.

Audiogram- the result of a hearing test on a chart. One axis being frequency also known as pitch measured with Hertz and the other being intensity measured by decibels.

Audiologist- medical professionals who diagnoses hearing loss and related conditions and also provides appropriate treatments.

Behind-The-Ear Hearing Aid (BTE hearing aid)- a type of hearing aid where the amplifier sits on top of the entire ear and the mold sits inside the ear.

Bilateral hearing loss- some degree of hearing loss on both sides/ears.

Cerumen- a fancy way of saying earwax.

Closed captions- a text display of the audio from a TV show, movie, or a video on a computer. It is usually displayed on the bottom of the screen. This is pretty similar to, but different from, subtitles.

Cochlear Implants- a type of device that helps deaf people hear to some degree. Only some deaf people can get them and even less want them or can afford them. Also, their hearing isn’t restored to a level that a person with no hearing loss has.

Conductive Hearing Loss- Hearing loss that is a result of an abnormality of the outer or middle ear.

Congenital Hearing Loss- hearing loss present at birth.

Deaf (culturally)- people who are considered Deaf typically uses American Sign Language, is part of the Deaf community, and celebrates hearing loss and Deaf culture. The capital D in Deaf is an important distinction. Deaf people might not be deaf and vice versa. deaf people, Read below for the term “deaf” with a lower case d.

deaf (phyiscally)- a condition of having very little to no hearing in one or both ears. May or may not consider themselves to be Deaf (culturally).

deaf community- includes many people other than people who have no hearing. There are family members of deaf and HoH people.

Decibel (dB) – unit used to measure loudness.

Eustachian Tube- one of my favorite words. Not entirely related, but it is the tube between your throat and middle ear that is responsible for equalizing the pressure in your ear with the pressure outside of your body.

Feedback- when the hearing aid is producing a high pitched squealing due to the hearing aid’s microphone picking up on the hearing aid’s output. It is pretty annoying.

Fingerspell- it is when you use the ASL alphabet to spell out words you either don’t know the sign to or words that doesn’t have a common sign. This is used a lot more than verbal English spelling, because there are quite a few words that don’t have signs.

Gain- the additional intensity that a hearing aid wearing gains by wearing hearing aid(s).

Hard of Hearing- a person who has mild to severe hearing loss that doesn’t consider themselves to be deaf. Usually their primary method of communication is speech and may know Sign language.

Hearing aids- a type of device used to help improve hearing and most commonly used by people with mild to severe hearing loss.

Hearing impaired- a somewhat offensive and outdated term for hearing loss, because it implies that the person is damaged and has something that needs to be fixed.

Hearing people- a person with no hearing loss.

HoH/HH- acronym for Hard of Hearing

(ASL) Interpreter- someone who translates spoken English to ASL and vice versa, so that people with hearing loss can understand surrounding spoken conversations.

Lipreading- a way of increasing understanding by trying to guess which words are being spoken by watching lips, though the degree it can help is limited.

Mainstream education- a child who goes to a local school that isn’t specifically for students with hearing loss or doesn’t have a hard of hearing/deaf program. The hard of hearing students is learning with hearing students, instead of mostly deaf and/or hard of hearing students.

Mixed Hearing Loss- when a person has both conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.

Noise Induced Hearing Loss- hearing damage that is a result of repeated exposure to really loud sounds for an extended period of time.

Reading lips- see lipreading.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss- hearing loss that occurs in the inner ear (Cochlea) or nerves that leads from the ear to the brain.

Service/hearing dog- a dog that aids many different type of people, but in this context will mean dogs that aid deaf and HoH people. They can act as ears and alert their owners of ringing doorbells, alarms, knocking, microwaves, and anything else that may make noises.

Speech–language pathologist- a fancy way of saying speech therapist, which is someone who diagnoses and treats various speech disorders and related conditions.

 

Hard of Hearing?

Hello!

My name is Mckena, I am 21 years old, and I am hard of hearing. What that means is that I have a hearing loss. A few common ways to shorten the term hard of hearing is HoH or HH. You may also see it written as hard-of-hearing. Personally it doesn’t really offend me, but calling someone hearing impaired may be seen as offensive to some, so I recommend that you avoid saying that.

I do wear hearing aids. I have worn two of them since I turned 3 years old, even though the hearing loss has been present since birth. I’ve always worn very bright and colorful hearing aids, because I’ve always wanted to have hearing aids that are prettier, instead of the plain skin color hearing aids that are almost completely hidden inside the ears.

I am hoping to cover many topics related to my experiences as a young adult with hearing loss. I hope that what I share is useful for people with many different levels of hearing loss and different ages. I am fully aware that this is a condition that is primarily associated with elderly people. I have gotten to hear the perspectives of the many different types of people with hearing loss.

Thank you for reading all of this! Let me know if there are any particular topics you want me to cover.